Saturday, February 5, 2011

More From Hancock Shaker Village


The woodshop (set up in the Tannery):


And two giant workbenches, one of which is "the" workbench, the one featured in "The Workbench Book" by Scott Landis:










In a comment about the previous post, Wesley mentioned the research being done into the Shaker's use of bright, colorful paint. When we visited, one room in the Brick Dwelling had been restored to this original paint scheme.

Here are some photographs:







And apparently, the early Shaker preference for bold colors was not limited to architecture and furnishings - as you can see below...











Man, those Millennial Laws went a bit too far!

Finally, here is an interesting article with more information on paint restoration at Hancock.


10 comments:

  1. Hi Dan,
    Great pics of the village. I really like that step stool on the "workbench". Did you get a look at the mortise machine?
    rjb37

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  2. RJB - The only mortise machine I remember was over in the Machine Shop. The last picture in the Hancock Safari post of the iron "paw" is from that treadle machine (if memory serves). Is there one in the woodshop now?

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  4. Ciao,
    your posts are very interesting.
    I enjoy to read this blog and admire your beautiful images.
    Thank you for sharing.

    Giuliano

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  5. Great blog!!! I hope you can visit my blog at www.roof-detective.blogspot.com and become a follower. I look forward to seeing you there.

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  6. I know Shaker furniture but have never seen where it is made. Facinating to see the workshop..and the pig!

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  7. Those old workbenches are great. Imagine how many projects were cranked out on those benches. Scott Landis did a great job with that book.

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  8. Giuliano and Roof-Detective - Thanks! Glad you are enjoying the blog.

    Al - I'm not sure where the original workshop was located. The one in the post is in what was originally the tannery. I'm pretty sure the workbench is original to Hancock, and some of the tools too, but if I recall correctly, a lot has been brought in from elsewhere.

    Glad you enjoyed the pig!

    John - I know, it's kind of mind boggling to think about...

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  9. Wow, I can't get over the clarity in the pics. I can almost smell the pine aroma of those wood shavings.

    I like the scribe in the second pic, it takes me back to my woodworking school days.

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  10. Dan - Thanks! But I think you meant to comment on the next post...

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